Ke Huy Quan from Goonies and Temple of Doom at Niagara Falls Comic

Ke Huy Quan — best known for his appearances in the 1980s Steven Spielberg productions of “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” (1984) as Harrison Ford’s sidekick ‘Short Round’ and “The Goonies” (1985) as inventor ‘Richard “Data” Wang’ — reminisces about his career, shares behind-the-scenes stories and answers fan questions at his 2019 Niagara Falls Comic Con Q&A panel.

Jonathan Luke Ke Huy Quan (born August 20th, 1971) is a Vietnamese-born American actor and stunt choreographer of Chinese descent who became a child actor at age 12 opposite Harrison Ford in “Temple of Doom.” In 1985, he co-starred in “The Goonies” as a member of the eponymous group of children. He played a pickpocket orphan in the 1986 Taiwanese movie “It Takes a Thief.” In 1987, he appeared in the Japanese movie “Passengers” with the Japanese idol singer Honda Minako. He played Sam on the short-lived TV series “Together We Stand” (1986–1987) and played Jasper Kwong in the sitcom “Head of the Class” from 1989 to 1991. He also starred in the movie “Breathing Fire” (1991) and had a small role in “Encino Man” (1992). He played the starring role in the 1993 Mandarin language TV show “The Big Eunuch and the Little Carpenter” which ran for forty episodes. He also starred in the 1996 Hong Kong/Vietnam collaboration movie “Red Pirate.” He last appeared onscreen in the 2002 Hong Kong movie “Second Time Around” alongside Ekin Cheng and Cecilia Cheung.

“The Goonies” is a 1985 American adventure comedy film that became a cult classic. It is centered on a band of kids who live in the “Goon Docks” neighborhood of Astoria, Oregon who attempt to save their homes from demolition, and in so doing, discover an old Spanish map that leads them on an adventure to unearth the long-lost fortune of One-Eyed Willy — a legendary 17th-century pirate. They are continuously chased by a family of criminals who want the treasure for themselves. In 2017, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant.”

Ryan Yeager

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